Architecture 1900: Stockholm, Helsinki, Tallinn, Riga, St. Petersburg

Architecture 1900 is an extensive exhibition catalogue that explores architectural contacts within the Baltic Sea region between 1895 and 1915. The richly illustrated book is divided according to the Baltic capitals: Stockholm – Meeting point and source of inspiration (text by Joakim Hansson); Helsinki – The years of growth (text by Eija Rauske); Tallinn – New clientele, new architecture (text by Karin Hallas-Murula); Riga – Battle of styles in multi-cultural city (text by Janis Lejnieks); and St. Petersburg – The challenge of modernization (text by Ljudmila A. Kirikova).

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Architecture 1900 is an extensive exhibition catalogue that explores architectural contacts within the Baltic Sea region between 1895 and 1915. As explained by Bitte Nygren, Director of the Swedish Museum of Architecture, this vivid period was the era of rapid industrialisation and the wake of growing national identity. Architects travelled and exchanged both stylistic and structural ideas; new materials and new building types such as factories, banks, powers stations and retail trade facilities called for new form solutions.

A world that is growing more and more internationalized gives cause for defining contacts which have existed between different areas through the ages and incorporating them into the cultural profile of the region. The countries round the Baltic Sea have been interlinked for many centuries, from the Viking era, through the Hanseatic period and Sweden’s Baltic hegemony of the 17th century, down to our time. The links have been both commercial and cultural. Trans-Baltic contacts between architects and architectures have made an important difference to the physical surroundings in which we are still living today. In fact it is only since the raising of the iron curtain and the recovery of independent by the Baltic states in the 1990s that we have become able to see and understand the full compass of this interchange.
— Tomas Möjberg, Joakim Hansson, Karin Hallas-Murula in Introduction, p. 6.

The richly illustrated book is divided according to the Baltic capitals: Stockholm – Meeting point and source of inspiration (text by Joakim Hansson); Helsinki – The years of growth (text by Eija Rauske); Tallinn – New clientele, new architecture (text by Karin Hallas-Murula); Riga – Battle of styles in multi-cultural city (text by Janis Lejnieks); and St. Petersburg – The challenge of modernization (text by Ljudmila A. Kirikova).

The copy for sale is in excellent condition.

Weight 701 g
Dimensions 21.3 × 26.2 × 1.5 cm
Author(s)

 Eija Rauske,  Joakim Hansson,  Karin Hallas-Murula,  Tomas Mjöberg, Bitte Nygren, Janis Lejnieks, Ludmila A. Kirikova

Binding

Hardcover

Condition

Images

drawings, maps

ISBN

9985-9400-5-9

Language

Number of pages

127

Publisher

Museum of Estonian Architecture

Publishing year

2003